Exceptional Children

The Exceptional Children’s program is supported by federal and state funding and serves approximately 2,000 students with disabilities ranging in age from 3 to 22.  The Randolph County School System’s EC Department provides a full continuum of support and services to students with a broad spectrum of abilities and disabilities.  We strive to ensure that students are served in the appropriate least restrictive environment (LRE) to promote their cognitive, physical, social/emotional, and vocational development.

The district adheres to North Carolina’s Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities, which is published by the Department of Public Instruction. 

N.C. State Improvement Project

The literacy infographic below is designed to inform parents of the coursework which helps teachers understand the science of teaching reading along with providing additional resources for parents.

The NC SIP APR infographic below was designed to share the NC SIP Annual Performance Report results which were shared in the June EC Director webinar.

Over the past 19 years through the Exceptional Children Division, NC SIP and the instructors developed through the grant have provided Reading Research to Classroom Practice (RRtCP) coursework statewide. RRtCP (formerly titled Reading Foundations) is high quality professional development grounded in the research and science of teaching reading that addresses the needs of students with persistent reading difficulties including the specific learning disability of dyslexia. Additionally, for the past 13 years, NC SIP has offered the Foundations of Math coursework to help educators improve math instruction for students challenged with learning math concepts including the specific learning disability of dyscalculia. Over the last 8 years, we have added a focus on evidence-based practices to address the needs in adolescent literacy.

NCSIP Literacy Infographic 2019

NCSIP APR Infographic 2019

NC SIP RCSS EC Parent Brochure in English and Spanish

Literacy and Math Resources for Parents

CORE Reading Progress Reports for Parents

Child Find Process

Project Child Find

In accordance with Child Find provisions, the Randolph County School System is committed to meeting the needs of students with disabilities.  

For more information regarding this effort, please select the following link:  NC Exceptional Children's Division - Project Child Find

Dispute Resolution

The Randolph County School System and the NC Department of Public Instruction, Exceptional Children’s Division, provide a range of resources to address concerns and resolve disagreements.  Concerns should be received and addressed at the level closest to which the concern originated.  The process at each level is outlined below. 

School Level:

  • Discuss concerns with student's teacher(s) 
  • Discuss concerns with student's principal 
  • Request an IEP team meeting

District Level: 

  • Contact the principal  
  • Contact the Director of Exceptional Children’s Services 

State Level:

  • Contact the Exceptional Children Division's consultants for dispute resolution and consultants for instructional support and related services.

For more information on Dispute Resolution and governing polices follow the link to the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction's webpage.
http://ec.ncpublicschools.gov/parent-resources/dispute-resolution

Student Transfer Process

If you are new to the Randolph County School System and have a child who has been receiving special education services, you will need to register your child at his/her designated home school. 

Enrollment Process for EC Students Transferring into RCSS:

  • Contact the appropriate home school to complete the registration process.
  • Provide a copy of the student’s IEP or documentation to verify the provision of EC services from the previous school.
  • The principal will contact the Exceptional Children’s Department if a child was previously served in a separate classroom setting.
Programs

PATH TO PRIDE
Maximize instructional time arrow Make every minute and every student count

The North Carolina Standard Course of Study is used throughout Randolph County School System. Our Exceptional Children teachers use a variety of strategies to help students progress through the curriculum, including co-teaching with general education teachers.   At the high school level, students with disabilities may participate in the Occupational Course of Study, a pathway leading to a North Carolina diploma.

Students with significant cognitive disabilities participate in the Extended Content Standards of the North Carolina Standard Course of Study.  This curriculum teaches the essential elements of the traditional course of study while also emphasizing the acquisition of functional skills.

Preschool Special Education Programs

The Randolph County School System’s Exceptional Children’s program provides preschool services to 3-, 4-, and non-kindergarten eligible 5-year old children who demonstrate significant delays in their development and have been evaluated and determined eligible for special education services.

Parents, physicians, child care providers, social workers, etc. who have any concerns regarding a preschooler’s development are encouraged to notify the Preschool Exceptional Children’s Department so that a developmental screening may be scheduled.

For information regarding Randolph County School System’s NC Pre-K program, please contact the Randolph County Partnership for Children at 336-629-2128.

Preschool Screening

Screening clinics are held bi-monthly at the Randolph County School System’s Central Service Offices, located at 2222-C South Fayetteville Street in Asheboro, NC. A developmental screening may include the following:

  • vision and/or hearing screening
  • social/developmental history
  • concepts
  • speech and language
  • motor skills

Parents can obtain additional information about this process by contacting Jennifer Beasley, Preschool Exceptional Children’s Coordinator, at (336) 318-6342.

Preschool Special Education Services

Preschool Special Education Services are based on an Individualized Education Program (IEP) that is written for each child determined eligible due to significant delays in developmental skills. Goals and objectives are written according to an educational model. Any related services that the child receives are designed to support the educational goals.

Preschool Classrooms

Special Education services for preschool children are provided in learning hubs, center-based programs, or other settings as outlined on the Individual Education Program (IEP).

Resources for Preschool Children with Disabilities

Children with disabilities from birth to 3 years old are identified through the Children’s Developmental Services Agency (CDSA). Referrals to the CDSA can be made by calling (336) 625-1076.

Family Support Network of Central Carolina  
http://www.fsncc.org/

Project Child Find 
http://ec.ncpublicschools.gov/policies/project-child-find 

Foundations for Early Learning and Development
http://ncchildcare.nc.gov/pdf_forms/NC_foundations.pdf

Elementary Special Education Programs

Educational service delivery may include, but is not limited to:

Inclusion in the general education classrooms

Service delivery in EC Classrooms

  • Cross-Categorical Resource Classrooms
  • Functional Skills Classrooms
  • Individualized Behavioral Support
  • Physical Therapy
  • Occupational Therapy 
  • Speech/Language Services
  • Itinerant Services

The Elementary Special Education Program provides and oversees services for children grades kindergarten through fifth grade that experience a variety of disabilities.

Students eligible for special education must receive special education services in their "least restrictive environment." Under IDEA, school districts are required to maintain a full continuum of educational placement options for students.

The IEP team determines the educational placement for each student after thoughtful and careful data dialogue regarding the functional and academic needs of the student. 

Resource

 The Elementary Resource program incorporates a variety of evidence-based teaching strategies and curricula options to facilitate academic instruction for students who have been identified for services by an IEP team. Inclusion opportunities utilizing the continuum of supports are available based on individual student needs.

Typically, resource students are included in the general education classrooms and receive special education support in the classroom or in a special education resource classroom for a portion of the day. EC teachers support students who need specially designed instruction so that students can access the general education curriculum. 

Functional Skills Classrooms

Functional Skills classrooms incorporate a variety of evidence-based teaching strategies and curricula to support students in developing functional academic, social, and independent living skills. These students typically require continuous care throughout the day provided by special education staff.

  • Student curriculum is highly individualized and utilizes specialized curriculum for academic progress.  Students in Functional Skills Classrooms follow the NC Extended Content Standards.
  • Self-help and adaptive living skills training are embedded throughout the day in various school settings.
  • Inclusion opportunities utilizing the continuum of supports are available based on student needs.
  • Students have the opportunities to access Art/Music, PE, Media Services and Technology with supervision from an EC teacher and paraprofessionals.
  • Students are typically on the non-diploma tract; students take the Alternate Assessment annually.

Cross-Categorical Classrooms

Cross-Categorical Classrooms incorporate a variety of evidence-based teaching strategies and curricula to facilitate academic instruction for students who are experiencing a significant delay in academic progress.

  • Inclusion opportunities utilizing the continuum of supports are available based on student’s needs.
  • Typically students require direct instruction in all areas of academics to make appropriate progress.
  • Students follow the core standards curriculum and supplemental curriculum is also introduced on an individual basis and is monitored for individual success.  IEP goals are also targeted throughout the day.
  • Social and behavioral skill instruction is integrated throughout the student's day.
  • Students access Art/Music, PE, Media Services and Technology.
  • These students are typically on the diploma track; students take the Standards Based Assessments annually but may require several approved accommodations.
Secondary Special Education Programs

Middle School 

The Middle School Special Education Program provides education services for students in the least restrictive learning environment. The Randolph County School System provides a continuum of placement options throughout the district’s seven middle school campuses to meet the needs of students as specified in the student's Individualized Education Program (IEP). Specialized classes are available for students who need highly structured learning environments, affective education, study skills, self-care and daily living skills.  The middle school student's educational program initiates the post-secondary transition focus towards helping students increase their independence and to make a successful transition to their goals for life after graduation.

High School

The High School Special Education Program provides a range of instructional, vocational, and support services for students attending one of the district’s six high schools and in the community. Students in high school special education classes receive services within a continuum ranging from support and assistance within general education classes to specialized instruction in special education classrooms. Specialized classes are available for students who need highly structured learning environments, affective education, study skills, and independent living skills. 

Ultimately, it is the IEP team who determines the educational placement for each student after thoughtful and careful dialogue regarding the functional and academic needs of the student.

Content Support/Curriculum Assistance

Content Support/Curriculum Assistance is typically offered as an elective class for students with an IEP within the middle and high school setting. This course is designed to provide explicit, direct, systematic and evidence-based instruction to support academic, social and behavioral skills; as well as reinforce the correct implementation of learned strategies in core classes.

Curriculum: NC Common Core State Standards

  • Instruction based on grade level Common Core State Standards

Supplemental Curriculum Resources:

  • Middle School - TransMath and HillRAP
  • High School – TransMath and Fusion Reading
Resource

Resource classes incorporate a variety of evidence-based teaching strategies and curricula to enable students to access the general curriculum. Practices of instruction include providing explicit, direct and systematic instruction, implementing modifications and accommodations, ongoing assessment and progress monitoring of benchmark performance, and assisting the student in making progress toward his/her annual IEP goals.

Curriculum: NC Common Core State Standards

  • Instruction based on grade level Common Core State Standards
Cross Categorical

Direct special education supports and services are provided within a special education class for specific core classes as outlined in the student’s Individual Education Program (IEP) using the general education curriculum with accommodations/modifications.

Curriculum: NC Common Core State Standards

  • Instruction based on grade level Common Core State Standards

Supplemental Curriculum Resources:

  • Middle School - TransMath

Inclusion opportunities using the continuum of supports are available based on students’ needs.

When considering a change in educational placement that requires a move to a more restrictive ennironment, all data will be reviewed at the Central Service level prior to any changes taking place.

Middle School Cross-Categorical Classrooms

  • Archdale-Trinity Middle School
  • Braxton Craven Middle School
  • Northeastern Randolph Middle School
  • Randleman Middle School
  • Southeastern Randolph Middle School
  • Southwestern Randolph Middle School
  • Uwharrie Middle School
Future-Ready Occupational Course of Study

The Future-Ready Occupational Course of Study is one of two courses of study that lead to a high school diploma. In the high school setting, Occupational Course of Study classes incorporate a variety of evidence-based teaching strategies and curricula targeting functional academics, vocational training, post-school employment and independent living. 

This program is intended to meet the needs of a small group of students with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities that require a modified curriculum focusing on post-school employment and independent living. 

Inclusion opportunities using the continuum of supports are available based on students’ needs.

Curriculum: Future-Ready Occupational Course of Study

  • Instructional delivery is provided through a blended learning program. Occupational Course of Study classes utilize the expertise of an Exceptional Children's teacher in conjunction with a highly qualified North Carolina Virtual Public Schools (NCVPS) teacher.

Future-Ready-Occupational Course of Study (FR-OCS) Course Requirements:

4 English credits (English I; English II*; English III & English IV)

3 Math credits (Introduction to Math I; Math I & Financial Management)

2 Science credits (Applied Science & Biology**)

2 History credits (American History I & American History II)

1 Health & Physical Education credit

4 Career Technical Education (CTE) credits

 6 Preparation credits for Occupational Preparation

*English II taken by 10th grade

**Biology taken by 11th grade

Work Requirements
School Based Hours
150
Community Based Hours
225
Paid Competitive Employment Hours (or Unpaid Vocational Training, etc. if paid options are exhausted)
225
Total Hours
600
Inclusion

Inclusion classes utilize the expertise of exceptional children teachers in conjunction with regular educators to provide optimum educational opportunities for students. Services may include adapting curricula, using behavioral supports and interventions, selecting appropriate accommodations and assisting students with study skills or organizational skills.

Curriculum: NC Common Core State Standards

  • Instruction based on grade level Common Core State Standards
Functional Skills

Functional Skills classrooms incorporate a variety of evidence-based teaching strategies and specialized curricula to support students with significant cognitive disabilities in developing functional academic, social, and independent living skills. These students typically require continuous support throughout the day provided by special education staff. Students in the Functional Skills classroom follow the NC Extended Content Standards and engage in a variety of community-based learning experiences to support transitional goals and independence.
In high school, students in Functional Skills classes utilize a Practical Assessment Exploration System (PAES) Lab, which is a comprehensive data-driven curriculum that provides assistance with determining a student’s career/vocational strengths, training and basic career & life skills, exploration through hands-on experiences, simulations of a work environment that allows staff to assess and address behaviors that may cause barriers to a competitive working environment, and assessment of the student’s ability to work, interests in specific types of work and the type of support an individual would potentially need in the workplace.

Curriculum: NC Extended Content Standards

  • Instruction based on extensions of grade level Common Core State Standards

Supplemental Curriculum Resources (Middle & High):

  • Teaching to the Standards – Math
  • Teaching to the Standards – Science
  • Teaching to the Standards – English Language Arts
  • Equals Math Curriculum
  • News 2 You – Theme-based curriculum on current events that encompasses all content areas
  • Edmark – English Language Arts
  • Microcomputer Evaluation of Careers & Academics (MECA) - Vocational skills

When considering a change in educational placement that requires a move to a more restrictive ennironment, all data will be reviewed at the Central Service level prior to any changes taking place.

Middle School Functional Skills Classrooms

  • Archdale-Trinity Middle School
  • Randleman Middle School
  • Southeastern Randolph Middle School
  • Southwestern Randolph Middle School

High School Functional Skills Classrooms

  • Providence Grove High School
  • Randleman High School
  • Southwestern Randolph High School
  • Wheatmore High School
Itinerant Services
Students with Autism who follow the NC Common Core Standards may receive special education supports and services from an itinerant special education teacher based on the student's IEP.  Supports may include social skills instruction, replacement behaviors, crisis intervention, short-term stabilization and reintegration into the regular education setting.  Itinerant teachers also provide modifications as well as consultation and support to instructional staff.
Eligibility
Eligibility is determined by the IEP Team, which includes a Local Education Authority (LEA), Special Education Teacher, Regular Education Teacher, the parent(s) and any other service provider that may work with the student.  Decisions are made based upon data and qualifications that are determined by the Public Schools of North Carolina, Exceptional Children Division.  They provide local units with detailed procedures for the delivery of special education services. These rules and regulations are detailed in Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities, Department of Public Instruction.

Services are provided under the following areas of identification:

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Deaf/Blindness
  • Deaf
  • Developmental Delay
  • Serious Emotional Disability
  • Hearing Impairment
  • Intellectual Disability
  • Multiple Disabilities
  • Other Health Impairment
  • Orthopedic Impairment
  • Specific Learning Disability
  • Speech/Language Impairment
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Visual Impairment
Transportation

EC TRANSPORTATION QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

DO ALL SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS RIDE ON SPECIAL BUSES?
Special transportation will be provided for students who need it because of their disability or the location of their program. Otherwise, they will ride the regular school bus. The Special Needs Transportation Department arranges curb-to-curb bus service for students who need it. School bus safety standards are always followed.

WHEN WILL YOUR CHILD’S BUS RIDE START?
Every effort is made to arrange transportation as quickly as possible. It takes 3 days for the school bus ride to be arranged. When the Exceptional Children’s Office assigns a student to a program two weeks or less before school starts, a bus route may not be arranged by the start of school. Parents may be asked to transport their child until transportation is arranged.

IF YOU MOVE, WILL YOUR CHILD RIDE THE SAME BUS?
An address change may require a bus change. Parents should call their child’s school office in advance to give them the date you are moving, the new address and phone number. Drivers cannot change routes/stops. Bus route changes take 3 days to start. If you move into a new school district, the students’ needs will be reassessed and possibly the school site changed.

WHAT IF A STUDENT IS PICKED UP AND DROPPED OFF AT AN ADDRESS OTHER THAN THEIR HOME?
Bus routes can only allow for one address for the pick-up and one address for the drop-off. One-day changes cannot be made. 

CAN THE PICK-UP AND DROP-OFF TIME CHANGE FROM DAY TO DAY?
Special education school bus routes vary according to the needs of each student riding. Be ready and watching for the school bus 10 minutes before it is scheduled to arrive. The school bus waits only 2-4 minutes for the student.

WHAT IF YOUR CHILD’S NEEDS CHANGE TO BEING BUSED IN A WHEELCHAIR OR WITH SPECIAL EQUIPMENT?A bus change may be necessary. Contact the School Office so that necessary arrangements can be made.

SCHOOL BUS DRIVER AND BUS MONITORS RESPONSIBILITIES

WHAT ARE THE SCHOOL BUS DRIVER’S RESPONSIBILITIES?
School bus drivers are professional drivers with special training and Commercial Driver Licenses. They work directly for the school district. Because of tight routing, they can only wait 2- 3 minutes at a bus stop before going on, and then it is your responsibility to get your child to school. If there is no monitor, the driver performs the assistant’s duties.

WHAT ARE SCHOOL BUS MONITORS’ RESPONSIBILITIES?
The school bus monitor works with the driver to be sure all the students are safe on the bus. They secure seat belts, wheelchairs, car seats, necessary supports, etc. The monitor maintains discipline, sees that students stay in their seats, and reports problems to the schools. They seek emergency medical help when needed.

CAN A BUS MONITOR COME TO THE DOOR TO PICK-UP AND DROP-OFF A STUDENT?
Bus Monitors can only work with students on the bus and assist with getting them on and off the bus. They cannot assist a student beyond the curb.

PARENT RESPONSIBILITIES

WHAT ARE THE PARENTS’ RESPONSIBILITIES?
Have your child fully clothed, toileted and ready at the bus stop 10 minutes before pick-up time. Accompany your child to the curb. Call the early office number or the driver when your child isn’t riding. If your child has not ridden for 3 days, the bus will stop coming until you call the School Office to restart your child. Notify the School Office in advance if your address, phone number, or day-care arrangements change.

IF YOUR CHILD MISSES THE BUS, CAN IT COME BACK?The driver cannot come back because of traffic and other route trips. Transport your child to school as quickly as possible.

WHAT ARE THE PARENTS Responsibilities AT DROP-OFF TIME?
Be at the bus stop 10 minutes before the bus is scheduled to drop off your child. Meet your child at the curb so that the driver can make custodial transfer of your child to you or another responsible person. Students who are not met will be referred to the Department of Social services, if an emergency contact cannot be reached.

HOW CAN A PARENT HELP MAKE THE SCHOOL BUS SAFE?
Teach your child the school bus safety expectations and appropriate bus-riding behavior.

WHY MUST THE PARENT FILL OUT THE TRANSPORTATION DATA SHEET?
Randolph County Schools require that emergency and health information be on file for each student. Parents must provide this information. The form should be filled out at the student’s Individual Education Program (IEP) meeting by school staff and parent together. This information is required before the student can ride the bus.

STUDENT BEHAVIOR

WHAT BEHAVIOR IS EXPECTED BY A STUDENT WHILE RIDING THE SCHOOL BUS?
We expect all students to follow the bus safety rules for the safety of your child and others who ride the bus.

HOW WILL DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS BE HANDLED?
Bus behavior problems are reported to the school on incident reports filled out by the bus driver or bus monitor. The Principal’s Office decides what disciplinary action will be taken to enforce safe behavior on the bus including - suspension from school, suspension of bus riding privileges, detention, parent conference, etc.

WHAT IF A STUDENT DOES NOT FOLLOW THE BUS SAFETY RULES?
Students who cannot or will not follow the bus safety rules will be suspended or some action taken to ensure the safety on the bus for themselves and all riders. If a student is in a fight or out of control while on the bus, 911 will be called for the sheriff’s department to take the child off bus.

GENERAL INFORMATION

ILL STUDENTS
If your child becomes ill during the school day, you will be expected to pick-up your child from the school.

QUESTIONS AND CONCERNS
If parents have additional questions or concerns about special education transportation, they may call the school office or the Special Needs Transportation Department at the number below.

SUPERVISOR AND HOURS
Supervisor is Derek Clark
In Office from 6:00 a.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Can be reached at Early Office number (Cell) from 6:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.
Other times, please call office number. If no one is available, leave message on voice mail. Your call will be returned ASAP.
Please use the Bus Garage phone number for emergencies only.

Related Services

Related services help children with disabilities benefit from their special education by providing extra help and support in needed areas. Related services can include, but are not limited to any of the following: 

  • Speech-language pathology and audiology services
  • Interpreting services
  • Psychological services
  • Physical therapy
  • Occupational therapy
  • Counseling services
  • Orientation and mobility
  • Transportation
Educational versus Medical Model of Service
Occupational therapy and physical therapy as educational support services can be quite different from those same services in a clinic or hospital. School-based therapists focus on removing barriers from students’ ability to learn, helping students develop skills which increase their independence in the school environment, and educating school personnel about the different considerations required for students with disabilities. Everything the therapist does with students in school must be educationally relevant. The therapist evaluates, assesses and accommodates functional abilities of students in school classrooms, hallways and other designated areas.
Eligibility for OT/PT

Occupational Therapy (OT) and Physical Therapy (PT) are related services under Part B of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and are provided to help a student with a disability to benefit from special education. As such, they are supportive services. OT/PT are designed to enhance the student's ability to fully access and be successful in the learning environment.  If your child has a disability, as defined by IDEA, and needs special education and related services to meet unique learning needs, then he/she might be eligible for these services. Your child must be eligible for special education before being considered for OT/PT services in the schools under IDEA.

Eligibility for special education does not mean automatic eligibility for related services.  Occupational therapy and physical therapy evaluations are conducted to determine a student's present level of performance and function at school.  These evaluations assist the IEP team in determining a student's strengths and needs in the educational environment.  The final determination for services is made by the multidisciplinary team in conjunction with the OT/PT evaluation results.

School-based therapy is designed to enhance the student's ability to fully access and be successful in the learning environment.  Therapy services in the schools are delivered in the manner that is least disruptive to the student’s educational experience. School based therapy is often provided via consultation or through a push in/pull out model addressing what will most efficiently facilitate functional performance within the school environment.  Despite the presence of a disability, the focus of intervention is NOT on remediation but rather, it is on enabling a student to make effective school progress in the least restrictive environment. These services are provided by a qualified occupational or physical therapist

Physical Therapy

Physical therapy means "services provided by a qualified physical therapist." These services generally address a child's posture, muscle strength, mobility, and organization of movement in educational environments.

Physical Therapy Services may include the following:

  • Train instructional and support staff to assist students with physical therapy   programs as needed during the school day.
  • Train special education transportation staff to increase knowledge of disabilities, mobility aids, appropriate handling of students during bus loading, unloading and emergency evacuations.
  • Identifying mobility aids/devices and modifying a child’s school environment to facilitate function and access.

Develop the student's skills as required for:

  • Safe mobility to access their educational environment
  • Positioning in the classroom
  • Accessing and participating in vocational tasks
  • Gross motor skills that rely on the large muscles of the body for physical movement
  • Increasing joint function, muscle strength, mobility, and endurance for accessing their educational environment and participating in their school day
Occupational Therapy

OT Practitioners are instructional partners who are often required to help evaluation and support students with learning differences because they have specific skills and expertise in creating a fit between the student/learner and the school context.  As occupational therapists, our goal is to maximize a student’s ability to independently and successfully participate in the educational process through the use of targeted, therapeutic activities, adaptation of the student's environment, and/or training and consultation with staff and families.  These services are always provided by a qualified occupational therapist.

Occupational Therapy Services in the schools focus on a child's ability to participate in the following occupations: 

  • Personal Care
  • Student role
  • Learning academics
  • Play
  • Community Work
  • Graphic communication

Within those areas, occupational therapy can address the following with students:

  • Fine motor skills to manipulate tools needed for education
  • Visual motor skills utilized for handwriting, cutting, classroom activities
  • Visual perceptual skills that can affect organization of work including writing and math
  • Self-care skills as they occur in the educational environment
  • Sensory proccessing difficulties that impact learning
  • Assess and modify vocational tasks as needed

OT Practitioners  also collaborate on the education team by working with people like:

  • Students to improve their performance in a variety of learning environments
  • Parents to help them support their children's learning and participation in school
  • Educators and other school support staff to plan and develop activities and environments that include all students
  • Teachers and assistants to support children's success and promote safety within the school environment
  • Administrators to provide training, recommmend equipment, and ways to modify existing building and curriculum to allow access for all
Documents, Links and Resources